But simple companionship and connectedness is often the meat and bones of a relationship – and you still have to prepare yourself for the absence of his or her warmth, smile and all the wonders of non-verbal communication.

So rarely does one cliche so succinctly sum up something.

There are different kinds of relationships across the miles and they require different things. Wonderful at your friend's wedding in Wisconsin – and you live in Biloxi. Wonderful you've been dating for five months in Biloxi gets sent to Chicago for a six-month assignment.

Or, worse yet, his dream job moves there permanently and you don't want to choose between your own dream job (still in Biloxi) and your dreamy boyfriend. You and Wedding Wonderboy are getting to know one another across the miles, while the relocations take away a known quantity.

Or are you just trying to maintain the relationship as it stands now, perhaps in a different place?

Recognize that you can't compare a long-distance relationship to one based on physical proximity.

But you may be surprised how much a relationship can grow – if you work at it.

Late-night talks and thoughtful letters can convey a lot of what is most important in the long-term: your goals, values and dreams.

Building a new relationship is a whole lot harder than maintaining an existing one.

The easiest one to weather is the temporary shift – if you're committed to the relationship, you just have to figure out a way to survive six difficult months. You can ease a lot of long-term discomfort and confusion by defining your expectations in advance.

For instance, unless you're looking for a casual, non-exclusive relationship, at some point, one of you is going to have to move.

That can add a whole lot of stress to your already strained couplehood. Are you evaluating whether one of you will move, and if so, does that mean marriage?