The Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Connecticut, became interested in investigating the role of pillow talk in relationships as people have such different experiences of it.Many people said they open up about their feelings to a partner after sex regardless of the length of a relationship – a time period described as the post-coital time interval (PCTI) by researchers Daniel Kruger and Susan Hughes.‘Why were some people sharing their innermost feelings, even when they knew the relationship had not yet reached that level?What effects would these post-coital disclosures have on relationship satisfaction?

Indeed, people consider cybersex to have a high degree of psychological reality—but many do not consider it to be consider it to be infidelity.

Many of them believe cybersex to be similar to pornography—an extension of fantasy that actually helps to keep them from physical affairs with other people.

Consider the following statement from a 41-year-old married man (all citations are from to cheat—something that may even add spice to their offline relationship.

In his stimulating paper, "Chatting Is Not Cheating," John Portmann defends online lust and characterizes about sex; he maintains that such talking is more similar to flirting than to having a sexual affair.

In reality, though, the issue of online cheating is more complex—especially when it concerns sexual activities involving actual interaction with other individuals.

People, consciously or not, consider their online sexual relationships as real—they experience psychological states similar to those typically elicited by offline relationships.

Accordingly, cybersex is about sex, but a form of sexual encounter involves experiences typical of other encounters, such as sexual arousal, masturbation, orgasm, and satisfaction.

To explore the relationship between hormones and communication decisions, she looked at what people talked about during PCTI as well as ‘one important variable [that] was likely influencing this whole process – orgasm.’ Both men and women experience a post-climax oxytocin surge but testosterone is believed to dampen the effects so that men typically fell less warm and fuzzy after sex.

A polarised view of crystals of Oxytocin is pictured Professor Denes believes that oxytocin is the reason why, as women who climax have more of the hormone in their systems, which increases feelings of trust and connection, than women who did not, influencing individuals’ decisions to talk about their feelings to their partners.‘A woman could be pregnant.